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The Best Mexican Women Writers You Need to Read
Written by Laura Torres

 

You could say that the most famous Mexican authors are big names such as Octavio Paz and Juan Rulfo. However, the rich tapestry of Mexican literature just wouldn’t be the same without some of its most iconic female writers too. From well-respected journalists to up-and-coming novelists and practically legendary playwrights, if you’re looking for some new literary inspiration, then read on for our guide to the ten best female Mexican writers that everyone should be reading...


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An introduction to Frida Kahlo in 9 Artworks
Written by Laura Torres

 

Frida Kahlo is arguably Mexico’s most famed, iconic artist. From her monobrow to her flower adorned hairstyles, her distinctive aesthetics garnered almost as much interest as her artwork that was dominated by self-portraiture; of her estimated 140 paintings, 55 are self-portraits. While many considered her a surrealist, Kahlo rejected that title, as her work was immensely autobiographical that focused on Mexicanidad (Mexicanness), the culture and tradition of her beloved patria (homeland) and compellingly introspective subject matter. Here’s a chronological introduction to this fascinating artist in nine artworks...


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A Guide to Mexico's Pueblos Mágicos
Written by Luis García

 

Mexico’s pueblos mágicos programme was developed by the tourist board in order to promote the rich cultural heritage and history of Mexico through smaller, once overlooked towns. Each of the 111 towns currently recognised as pueblos mágicos offer something a little different, whether that’s fantastic architecture, stunning natural wonders or even just great regional food. With that in mind, here’s your guide to just 11 of the best pueblos mágicos in the country...


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Mesoamerican Commerce -
The Phoenicians of Middle America

Written by Tim Hazell

Trade and External Contacts:

Among the Maya from the beginning of the Pre-Classic period  (c. 2000 BC - AD 250), communities were reaching out, often to considerable distances to obtain raw materials or finished goods.  By the time of the Spanish conquest, the Post-Classic (c. AD 950 - 1539) Maya were participants in a widespread network of trade and exchange reaching south as far as Panama and north to Central Mexico.  Columbus, on his fourth voyage of 1502, encountered an Indian canoe near the Bay Islands off Honduras as long as a western galley and 8 feet in width.  The vessel was  filled with cotton cloth of many designs and colors, shorts that reached the knees, flint knives, cloth for cloaks, swords of wood with flakes of flint set along the edges and produce from Honduras, as well as copper axes, bells and cacao beans; the standard Mesoamerican unit of currency...


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